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In hospitals and doctor’s offices, you expect sanitary and sterile conditions. When you have a surgery, the tools used should be completely sterile; if they aren’t, then there is an increased risk of infection.

When a hospital doesn’t take the steps necessary to reduce the spread of infection, it can lead to death. Patients in hospitals tend to be vulnerable, since many have weakened immune systems and surgical or non-surgical wounds. Knowing that safety standards haven’t been kept up or failing to sterilize or sanitize equipment is an act of negligence that patients can file a claim for.

When you think of people suffering from infections in hospitals, you might think of kids or adults with open wounds or injuries, but even infants can be in danger. An article from Brainerd Dispatch discussing the rise of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus reported how the child, a baby born 15 weeks premature, died after just 17 days due to an infection from this antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria.

What that mother didn’t know was that her child was the fourth to catch the infection in the neonatal unit and one of 12 total who were sickened from it. It’s not just babies, either; a three-year-old girl died from complications resulting from the flu and MRSA, a 64-year-old man suffered a MRSA infection combined with a cardia arrhythmia that resulted in his death, and there have been several others.

What’s probably most important to know about the MRSA antibiotic resistant strain and other antibiotic-resistant infections is that they aren’t well tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency doesn’t have the legal, political or financial ability to monitor the outbreaks. As a result, patients are at risk, and many are dying.